Panolux
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Panolux 135 and 150

The new PANOLUX

The PANOLUX is an exposure metering and control module which you can purchase in addition to your NOBLEX. The PANOLUX automatically controls the exposure time of your camera. There are two measuring methods for this: reflective metering (light metering in direction of the subject), and metering of incident light. The incident light metering offers two different methods of measuring: pure metering of incident light (metering of the light falling on the subject and/or the white diffuser independent of the reflection qualities of the subject) and subject-oriented metering of incident light (simultaneous reading with the detector cell and the diffuser which means that the reflections of the subject are taken into consideration). When working in reflective metering or subject-oriented metering of incident light it is also possible to enter correction factors into the PANOLUX which influence the drum rotation speed during the exposure process. According to the correction factor set on the PANOLUX, the lens drum moves slower or faster in the corresponding parts of the exposure and different exposure times are produced during one drum rotation. Typically, a slower rotation will ‚brighten‘ that area. Conversely, a faster rotation will ‚darken‘ that portion of the photograph. There are 4 measuring methods available:

  1. Reflective Metering
    Reflective reading is carried out by the front detector cell (808). The PANOLUX measures the light reflected from your subject. To avoid an overweighting of the bright sky portion, the measuring axis of the front detector cell (808) is anlged down by approx. 15°. When normally holding the camera, an area approx. 18 feet in front of the camera is measured. The measuring anlge is approx. 33°.
  2. Reflective Metering with Exposure Correction
    It is possible to influence the exposure time measured by reflective metering by entering correction factors. This results in a dynamic change of the shutter speed rotation during the exposure. That means when using correction factors the lens drum moves slower or faster in the corresponding parts of the exposure and different exposure times are produced during one drum rotation. 
  3. Metering of Incident Light
    When working with the pure metering of incident light the light falling on your subject (respectively on the white diffuser (807)) is measured. The measurement does not take into account any reflected light. The incident light is measured by two light sensors oriented to the back right and to the back left under the white diffuser (807). When measuring the incident light the average value between both light sensors is determined. This average exposure time is basis for the complete exposure.
  4. Subject-oriented Metering of Incident Light
    When working with the subject-oriented metering of incident light all three light sensors (807 and 808) are active. This kind of metering results in an automatic exposure compensation by different drum speeds during the exposure process. The compansation is intensified when entering positive correction factors or can be reversed when entering negative correction factors (verticals). Here an example: Sunlight falls from the back over your right shoulder on the subject. Consequently, the left part of your subject is brighter (too bright) and the right part of the subject is darker (too dark). The different measurements of the two light sensors under the white diffuser (807) result in a faster rotation of the lens drum in the left part of your subject and in a slower rotation of the lens drum in the right part of your subject. An exposure compansation takes place during the lens rotation. The exposure time for the middle part of the subject is measured by the front detector cell (808).
  5. Verticals
    When taking verticals with automatic contrast compansation, it is always necessary to set a negative correction factor. Here is the explanation: Camera and PANOLUX are in a vertical position. The light sensor which points to the sky measures a brighter value, the light sensor which points to the ground measures a darker value. According to the logic used for the exposure compansation the PANOLUX electronics would interpret the brighter part of the subject at ground level. The contrast between sky and ground would be infensified. However, when using negative correction factors this effect is reversed. The PANOLUX has an effect of a graduated filter. The sky becomes darker and the ground brighter.